11/10/2011

Footloose


Even before the world's finances went to shit, the Tories took over and everyone signed up for the dole, it feels like we've been perpetually been re-living the 80s for quite some time. Music and fashion have long since been taking inspiration from the incorrectly tagged 'decade that style forgot' so it's no surprise that cinema has caught up. Fame, Clash of the Titans, The Kung Fu Karate Kid,, Nightmare on Elm Street and many others have already hit cinemas with varying results and there's plenty more to come including WarGames and Dirty Dancing. This has caused me a few 80s-loving bloggers to punch themselves in the ovaries but annoyingly, this modern take (*vomit*) on 1984's star-making Footloose is-sort-of-but-more-than-a-little-bit-good. I hate you, Hollywood.

After several setbacks (director Kenny Ortega and Zac Efron bolted and his replacement, Chace Crawford, did the same soon after) it looked like this was destined for disaster but writer/director Craig Brewer has managed to simultaneously pay homage to the original while successfully making it a totally harmless and enjoyable bit of fluff.


After the death of his mother, Ren McCormack (Kenny Wormald) moves his magnificent quiff and permanent "I just sucked a lemon" pout from Boston to Bomont, a town still reeling from a car crash which claimed the lives of four teens including the son of the Rev. Moore (Dennis Quaid). As he begins to rile the backwards, buck-toothed townsfolk with his city ways and smart mouth, he soon learns that not only is loud music and leather jackets frowned upon, they aren't allowed to dance either. So far, so familiar. In fact, very little has been changed from his stress-reliving solo in an abandoned warehouse to Ariel's (Julianne Hough) "rebellious" red leather cowboy boots and it's all the better for it. Instead of ignoring the original it blatantly acknowledges it with more nods than the Churchill dog.

*chortle*

It's obviously unnecessary but as far as remakes goes, this is the best one I've seen and any film that begins with a Kenny Loggins classic is fine by me. This guy clearly agrees:


I love you, Internet.